Periospectives October-December 2013 : Page 20

ANNUAL MEETING Get to know the 2013 Balint Orban and Research Forum winners Jennifer Bain Balint Orban Basic Science University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL Enhancement of the Regenerative Potential of Commercially Available Bone Graft Utilizing a Novel Technology Explain the results of your winning research. My project involved delivery of osteoinductive peptides (DGEA and BMP2-mimetic peptide) to bone graft materials. I utilized negatively charged heptaglutamate (E7) that binds tightly to calcium within the bone grafts. In vitro studies showed greater loading and retention of E7-modified peptides onto 4 distinct bone graft materials. A rat subcutaneous model using bovine bone modified with peptides (±E7) or rBMP2 showed that E7BMP2 peptide resulted in more ectopic bone formation than all other peptide groups or uncoated graft and comparable results to rBMP2. In addition, a critical size mandibular defect model was used and PET/CT imaging showed that E7BMP2 peptide had greater bone activity at 4 weeks than all other peptide groups and was comparable to rBMP2. However, by 8 weeks, the E7BMP2 peptide group had statistically greater bone activity than all groups including rBMP2. Interestingly, no side effects were seen with any of the peptide groups or uncoated graft, but inflammation, swelling, and cataract-like lesions were noted in the rBMP2 group. This is significant because E7BMP2 peptide is a 27 amino acid sequence that is simple and cost-effective to produce. It anchors at the site where bone regeneration is needed onto products clinicians are already comfortable using. What do you like to do when you’re not working on your research? Family is very important to me. I have the most supporting and wonderful husband, Jacob, to whom I have been married for nine years. We have a two-and-a-half year-old son, Jonah, and three dogs (Jack, Cocoa, and Jordan). When I am not working on research or seeing patients, I spend as much time with my family as possible. Bradley Weinstein Balint Orban Clinical Science University of Washington, Seattle, WA Prevalence of Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis: A 10-Year Follow-Up Explain the results of your winning research. Peri-implantitis is a growing issue in practice, and researchers worldwide are currently adding to our knowledge and understanding of the disease. In fact, the number of publications in PubMed with “peri-implantitis” in their title has grown almost exponentially in the past 20 years. However, to date, there has not been a 10-year study in a U.S. population to determine the prevalence rate and risk factors for peri-implantitis. Our research examined 96 patients with 225 implants and determined that one in four patients and one in five implants had peri-implantitis at 11 years. Peri-implantitis was strongly correlated with periodontitis and its severity. Our quality-of-life questionnaire results showed that patients with peri-implantitis are more likely to report problems with their implant, suggesting that patients may be aware of the disease. We also found some interesting differences between implant brands. Will you continue this research? Yes. I hope to be involved in the next phases of the project which will involve dose testing, among other things, paving the way for clinical trials. Will you continue this research? My collaborator, Diane Daubert, will be continuing the research. As part of our research examinations, we have collected microbial samples from all 225 implants and from the buccal mucosa of each patient’s mouth. These samples will now be analyzed to determine how specific bacterial communities predispose an implant to peri-implantitis. For What’s next for your career? I am on schedule to complete my Ph.D. in the spring 2014. After that, I hope to obtain a tenure-track faculty position at a dental school. AAP Perio spectives | 20

2013 Balint Orban And Research Forum Winners

Jennifer Bain

Balint Orban Basic Science University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL Enhancement of the Regenerative Potential of Commercially Available Bone Graft Utilizing a Novel Technology

Explain the results of your winning research.

My project involved delivery of osteoinductive peptides (DGEA and BMP2-mimetic peptide) to bone graft materials.I utilized negatively charged heptaglutamate (E7) that binds tightly to calcium within the bone grafts. In vitro studies showed greater loading and retention of E7- modified peptides onto 4 distinct bone graft materials. A rat subcutaneous model using bovine bone modified with peptides (±E7) or rBMP2 showed that E7BMP2 peptide resulted in more ectopic bone formation than all other peptide groups or uncoated graft and comparable results to rBMP2. In addition, a critical size mandibular defect model was used and PET/CT imaging showed that E7BMP2 peptide had greater bone activity at 4 weeks than all other peptide groups and was comparable to rBMP2. However, by 8 weeks, the E7BMP2 peptide group had statistically greater bone activity than all groups including rBMP2. Interestingly, no side effects were seen with any of the peptide groups or uncoated graft, but inflammation, swelling, and cataract-like lesions were noted in the rBMP2 group. This is significant because E7BMP2 peptide is a 27 amino acid sequence that is simple and cost-effective to produce. It anchors at the site where bone regeneration is needed onto products clinicians are already comfortable using.

Will you continue this research?

Yes. I hope to be involved in the next phases of the project which will involve dose testing, among other things, paving the way for clinical trials.

What’s next for your career?

I am on schedule to complete my Ph.D. in the spring 2014.After that, I hope to obtain a tenure-track faculty position at a dental school.

What do you like to do when you’re not working on your research?

Family is very important to me. I have the most supporting and wonderful husband, Jacob, to whom I have been married for nine years. We have a two-and-a-half year-old son, Jonah, and three dogs (Jack, Cocoa, and Jordan). When I am not working on research or seeing patients, I spend as much time with my family as possible.

Bradley Weinstein

Balint Orban Clinical Science University of Washington, Seattle, WA Prevalence of Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis: A 10-Year Follow-Up

Explain the results of your winning research.

Peri-implantitis is a growing issue in practice, and researchers worldwide are currently adding to our knowledge and understanding of the disease. In fact, the number of publications in PubMed with “peri-implantitis” in their title has grown almost exponentially in the past 20 years. However, to date, there has not been a 10-year study in a U.S. population to determine the prevalence rate and risk factors for peri-implantitis. Our research examined 96 patients with 225 implants and determined that one in four patients and one in five implants had peri-implantitis at 11 years. Peri-implantitis was strongly correlated with periodontitis and its severity. Our quality-of-life questionnaire results showed that patients with peri-implantitis are more likely to report problems with their implant, suggesting that patients may be aware of the disease. We also found some interesting differences between implant brands.

Will you continue this research?

My collaborator, Diane Daubert, will be continuing the research. As part of our research examinations, we have collected microbial samples from all 225 implants and from the buccal mucosa of each patient’s mouth. These samples will now be analyzed to determine how specific bacterial communities predispose an implant to peri-implantitis. For Instance, a logical question from the research conclusions might be “is the strong correlation between periodontitis and peri-implantitis due to common microbial communities or to other (host/patient) factors?” Our microbial analysis will help to answer this question.

What’s next for your career?

I have joined the practice of Jansen Richins, Bobby Butler, and Bob O’Neal in downtown Seattle (seattleperio.com). I will also be teaching at the University of Washington as an affiliate faculty member each week. I am currently working on a review for Periodontology 2000 on the pathogenesis of periodontitis, and I am lecturing on “Decision Making with Esthetic Implant Sites” and “Peri-implantitis Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment.”

What do you like to do when you’re not working on your research?

I have a labradoodle that keeps my wife and me company on long walks in Seattle. I also like to cycle and sail in the summertime and ski in the wintertime to stay active. I enjoy cooking, and when I can find the time I play the piano and go to jazz concerts.

Emiko Saito

Research Forum Basic Science.Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Periodontal Healing Following Various Implantation Methods of BMP-2, BFGF-2, and EMD in Circumferential Defects

Explain the results of your winning research.

Since I was a graduate student, I have researched periodontal regeneration for periodontitis with circumferential defect. Periodontal tissue regeneration is reported to occur at two regions: one is where alveolar bone regeneration takes place, and the other is where periodontal ligament and cementum regeneration takes place. At the AAP’s 2012 Annual Meeting, I reported on the periodontal healing in two spaces after implantation using a combination of two out of three growth factors (BMP-2, bFGF-2 and EMD) using the double-layer constitution method that we devised. The result of this Study was that BMP-2 with bFGF-2 and BMP-2 with EMD implantation using the double-layer constitution method enhanced periodontal regeneration without aberrant healing, such as ankylosis and root resorption.This double-layer constitution method divided the space of periodontal regeneration into periodontal ligament and cementum regeneration space (inner space) and bone regeneration space (outer space), and that was implanted with suitable growth factor for each region.From the result of this study, I would like to suggest the new opinion that periodontal regeneration using growth factors with double-layer constitution method will occur at two healing stages in each region. In addition, this implantation method could create two spaces of the periodontal regeneration, and thus could control proliferation and differentiation.

Will you continue this research?

I am going to continue this research with my co-authors: my husband and students. In the future, I would like to develop a new carrier that could control proliferation and differentiation by release of the growth factors and space making, and research the best implantation method along with the best combination of growth factors in order to achieve good periodontal regeneration.

What’s next for your career?

In the future, I would like to research abroad, because I research with the broadest possible view. In addition, I would like to educate as many people as possible about my research, both in Japan and abroad.

What do you like to do when you’re not working on your research?

I like to cook cuisine from all over the world. Of course, I especially like Japanese cuisine, as that is my homeland.Dinner is my favorite meal. I am working to expand my repertoire of meals from different countries. I also host gatherings at my home to strengthen relationships with young researchers.

Sari Hershenfield

Research Forum Clinical Science.University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada No Association between Periodontitis and Obesity in a Nationally Representative Sample of Canadian Adults

Explain the results of your winning research.

My research examined the association between periodontitis and obesity using data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007-2009). There was no statistically significant association between the two conditions in this nationally representative sample of Canadian adults.

Will you continue this research?

The association between periodontitis and general health continues to be a research interest of the Departments of Periodontology and Dental Public Health at the University of Toronto. With a variety of conditions suggested as potential periodontal risk factors, it is hoped that further investigations will provide us with a greater understanding of the pathogenesis, prevention, and management of periodontal disease.

What’s next for your career?

I am currently completing my Master of Science degree and residency in periodontology. Upon graduation, I look forward to integrating my research background both in clinical practice and while teaching as a parttime instructor at the University of Toronto.

What do you like to do when you’re not working on your research?

Outside of my studies, I enjoy traveling the world with my husband, keeping active on water, snow, or dry land, and spending as much time as possible with close family and friends.

Sherin Merchant

Research Forum Clinical Impact.University of florida, Gainesville, FL Clinical Response of Primary versus Permanent Dentition with Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

Explain the results of your winning research.

Current literature is not available regarding the response to treatment of localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in primary versus permanent dentitions. The objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of periodontal therapy on the clinical outcome of primary versus permanent dentition with LAP. Patients underwent periodontal therapy which consisted of full-mouth mechanical debridement at baseline, 3, 6, and 12-month appointments. Overall, periodontal therapy was found to be effective in the clinical outcomes of both primary and permanent dentition. Although baseline clinical attachment loss (CAL) was similar between the groups, the reductions in mean CAL at 3, 6, and 12 months as well as reduction in percentage of plaque at 3 months were significantly greater in primary dentition as compared to permanent dentition. A greater reduction in CAL in LAP of primary dentition may suggest that these younger individuals may carry greater propensity for positive treatment outcomes and healing potential as compared to permanent dentition individuals.

Will you continue this research?

The next step for this project is to determine if the specific dentition affects the prognosis of this disease and to evaluate how these different dentitions affected the hosts’ response to LPS stimuli after treatment. Our preliminary data show that not only do children with primary dentition affected by LAP respond better to treatment than those with permanent dentition, but also that the inflammatory response to LPS at baseline for permanent dentition children affected by LAP is elevated compared to that of primary dentition. These data provide initial evidence as to why treatment response may be Superior in primary dentition. The inflammatory response to LPS up to 12 months after treatment will be analyzed to evaluate if permanent dentition continues to have elevated cytokine levels after baseline. Inflammatory response results by means of cytokine release will hopefully lead to the understanding of why children with primary dentition affected by LAP respond better to periodontal treatment than children with LPA-affected permanent dentition.

What’s next for your career?

As a current undergraduate predental student at the University of Florida, I hope to be accepted to a dental school for the upcoming 2014 cycle and eventually matriculate into a DMD/PhD program. Ultimately, I wish to become a faculty member focusing on clinical research by following the steps of my research mentor Dr. Luciana Shaddox. As a side note, I would like to thank the McNair Scholars program for their support thus far.

What do you like to do when you’re not working on your research?

When I am not working on research, I enjoy exploring new food, watching movies, and reading.I also love spending time with my family and friends, as they are the most important to me.

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AAP student members Drs. Allen Liu (shown here, wearing his AAP logo scrub shirt) and Colin Graser each won a Galaxy tablet from the AAP in a raffle during the Academy’s student recruitment drive.

Read the full article at http://onlinedigeditions.com/article/2013+Balint+Orban+And+Research+Forum+Winners/1598004/190369/article.html.

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