NAHS News Spring 2014 Volume 44 No.1 : Page 1

N A TI O N AL AR T SCHOLARSHIP N A page 1 page 8 page 42-55 pages 55-56 AR T H O N O R CHAR A C TER SER VICE A publication of the National Art Education Association 1806 Robert Fulton Drive, Suite 300, Reston, VA 20191-1590 • w w w.ar teduc ators.org • 703-860-8000 s NEWS SO CIE TIES Volume 44, No. 2 1 1 , No. Volume 4 Spring 2014 Winter 2011-201 2 Inside nahS Student artworK pages 9–41 Zoe Kasprzyk Receives 2014 Rising Stars Secondary Recognition Program Award Southern High School, Harwood, MD NAHS nahS riSinG Star nahS SponSor oF the year Z nahS chapter reportS NJAHS nJahS SponSor oF the year page 8 nJahS chapter reportS oe Kasprzyk is a 2014 Rising Star! A Senior at Southern High School in Harwood, MD, she has served as NAHS Historian. She fi nds strength and escape in art, and draws inspiration from her peers as well as her instructors: “Th e fusion of ideas that you see in our art classroom is hard to fi nd anywhere else, and the importance of encourag-ing students to work together can’t be stressed enough.” An award winner at multiple school and local exhibitions, she is also active in her NAHS chapter: face-painting fundrais-ers, painting multiple murals, and other community-service projects. With other NAHS offi cers, she traveled the county, documenting on video the murals their Art Department had painted and helping secure a $500 grant! Accomplished in academics as well as the arts, Zoe earned $576,976 in scholarship off ers, is an honor roll student also active in athletics. Art Department Chair Michael Bell shared, “Zoe is a multi-talented young lady whom I’ve had the pleasure of teaching for the past four years, fi rst as her instructor in the AACPS Gift ed Visual Arts Program… and then as her art teacher grades 10-12, from Studio I Drawing through Honors Level 3 and AP Drawing this school year. She’s quiet, unassuming, well-mannered, respect-2014 NAEA Rising Star Zoe Kasprzyk (center) with NAHS Sponsor Michael Bell and Eleni Dykstra, ful, and possesses all the qualities that AACPS Acting Coordinator of Art. represent the kind of character you want in your NAHS President, but when she gets behind that easel or that visual journal… LOOK OUT!! She’s a ROCK STAR!” Zoe is also principal violinist in the school orchestra. Early in the school year, Orchestra Director Brian Forte had “already grown to rely on her for her leadership and her artistic tuitions.” He observed, “She is very conscientious, and is always on time with her assignments. She will certainly be a ‘mover and a shaker’ in the world when she gets older.” English Teacher David Whewell noticed how Zoe’s “energy, enthusiasm, and interest”—as well as her creativity—is what sets her apart from her peers, even among Advanced Placement students. “She is an intense young woman who thrives in an educational setting. Th ere is a wonder that seems to exist in Zoe that drives her and allows her success. She soaks up information in class, and brings that fascination for the world into every assignment she completes.” She is a hard worker, he adds: “She sees what she needs to be successful and then does it. I have watched Zoe go the extra mile on several occasions so far this year, and am sure she will not stop when she graduates from high school.” Congratulations, Zoe! Dates to Remember! OCTOBER 1 Nominations for NAHS and NJAHS Sponsor Award due. Nominations for Rising Star Secondary Recognition Award due. NOVEMBER 1 Winter NAHS News chapter reports due. DECEMBER 15 Charles M. Robertson Memorial Scholarship Applications due. JANUARY 31 Is your chapter registered this school year? MARCH 1 Spring NAHS News chapter reports due. SPRING Hold your induction or recognition ceremony. Please allow 4 weeks for processing and shipment of all NAHS/NJAHS orders. Continued on page 4

Zoe Kasprzyk Receives 2014 Rising Stars Secondary Recognition Program Award

Zoe Kasprzyk Receives 2014 Rising Stars Secondary Recognition Program Award

Southern High School, Harwood, MD

Zoe Kasprzyk is a 2014 Rising Star! A Senior at Southern High School in Harwood, MD, she has served as NAHS Historian. She finds strength and escape in art, and draws inspiration from her peers as well as her instructors: "Th e fusion of ideas that you see in our art classroom is hard to find anywhere else, and the importance of encouraging students to work together can't be stressed enough."

An award winner at multiple school and local exhibitions, she is also active in her NAHS chapter: face-painting fundraisers, painting multiple murals, and other community-service projects. With other NAHS officers, she traveled the county, documenting on video the murals their Art Department had painted and helping secure a $500 grant! Accomplished in academics as well as the arts, Zoe earned $576,976 in scholarship off ers, is an honor roll student also active in athletics.

Art Department Chair Michael Bell shared, "Zoe is a multi-talented young lady whom I've had the pleasure of teaching for the past four years, first as her instructor in the AACPS Gift ed Visual Arts Program… and then as her art teacher grades 10-12, from Studio I Drawing through Honors Level 3 and AP Drawing this school year. She's quiet, unassuming, well-mannered, respectful, and possesses all the qualities that represent the kind of character you want in your NAHS President, but when she gets behind that easel or that visual journal… LOOK OUT!! She's a ROCK STAR!"

Zoe is also principal violinist in the school orchestra. Early in the school year, Orchestra Director Brian Forte had "already grown to rely on her for her leadership and her artistic tuitions." He observed, "She is very conscientious, and is always on time with her assignments. She will certainly be a 'mover and a shaker' in the world when she gets older."

English Teacher David Whewell noticed how Zoe's "energy, enthusiasm, and interest"-as well as her creativity-is what sets her apart from her peers, even among Advanced Placement students. "She is an intense young woman who thrives in an educational setting. Th ere is a wonder that seems to exist in Zoe that drives her and allows her success. She soaks up information in class, and brings that fascination for the world into every assignment she completes." She is a hard worker, he adds: "She sees what she needs to be successful and then does it. I have watched Zoe go the extra mile on several occasions so far this year, and am sure she will not stop when she graduates from high school."

Congratulations, Zoe!

Artist's Statement: Zoe Kasprzyk

There is no better way to learn about art education than being a student. Were it not for the wonderful teachers and students I've been lucky enough to work with throughout middle school and high school, I would not be where I am today.

The most important lesson that I've learned in art is that your art should mean something to you. Art isn't always just something nice to look at. Art is expression. Art is communication. Art is a way to discover things about yourself. I believe that it's the art educator's job to promote freedom in the studio, to encourage students to push their boundaries, and to promote enthusiasm. At times where I've been discouraged, or was losing steam, my teachers inspired me and reawakened that excitement.

This past year has been an especially rough year. Besides being stressed out by schoolwork, college applications, a job, sports, and other extra-curricular activities, I've had many other things going on. My grandfather recently passed away, and my neighbor was taken by pancreatic cancer. My best friend has been having family issues and has a hard time dealing with anxiety. At times the stress can just be overwhelming, and that's where art helps me the most.

When I have so many things weighing on my mind, art allows me to lose myself, if only for a bit. The studio is a place where I can escape the everyday wear and tear, and just focus on my work. Lately, I've been working on focusing on myself, and figuring out my priorities. What I do this year will determine where I am, in terms of school and a career. Soon I'll be making some of the biggest decisions of my life, and that scares me. Art allows me to enter my own little world, and relax, before I go back out again. Art helps me to find strength.

Next to art educators, it's important to recognize the influence of my peers. As a freshman, I found the work of the older students to be awesome and inspiring. I was good for a middle schooler, but I was introduced to a whole new level of work when I moved up to high school. Watching and working next to the upperlevel students gave me a new place to aspire to be. Working next to other National Rising Star award winners over the years has also been invaluable to me in terms of developing skill, technique, and character. The fusion of ideas that you see in our art classroom is hard to find anywhere else, and the importance of encouraging students to work together can't be stressed enough.

An arts educator is someone who encourages you to keep working, pushes you to improve, and helps you to find value in your work. Now that I'm one of the upper-level students that others look up to I have the power to help my peers improve and learn about themselves, and I hope to help students of my own in the future as an arts educator.

Q&A With Zoe Kasprzyk

Q: Why is visual art so important to you?

A: The visual arts allow me to express myself and find a release, but perhaps more importantly is the relevance of art to many fields and issues. Art is something that virtually anyone can understand, which makes it a powerful tool, and is why we need artists in fields such as science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Artists have the ability to think and communicate in ways that others can't, and when it comes to problem solving it's important to work with diverse mindsets. I've always had a great love for both art and science, and until recently I thought that I'd have to choose one or the other, but it turns out that art is incredibly versatile and useful when it comes to interdisciplinary studies. We have many issues to be concerned about, such as global warming and disease, which require multi-faceted approaches. Art has helped me through many personal issues, and now I hope that art will allow me to make a difference.

Q: What are your plans after high school? How does art play a part in those future plans?

A: After high school, I plan to work towards a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry at Washington University in St. Louis, while continuing my studies as an artist. If possible, I will dual degree or double major in both chemistry and art. I believe that art will help me to continue being successful in the sciences, and allow me to unwind when things get stressful. Though I don't yet know how I will combine art and science, the possibilities are endless and I intend to create my own path in life.

Q: What do you use for inspiration?

A: My inspiration usually stems from my own experiences, as I believe that you can't truly understand an idea if it isn't something that you yourself have experienced. This past year, art has served primarily as an escape from stress. Handling a rigorous course load along with extracurricular activities, a job, and deciding where I'll be going for the next four years hasn't been easy, to say the least. Art feels natural, calming, and allows me to be myself.

NAHS & NJAHS Awards Program

Nomination forms and awards booklet can be found at: www.arteducators.org/awards

CHARLES M. ROBERTSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Established to honor the memory of Charles M. Robertson for his many years of service to NAEA and the Pratt Institute, this 4-year partial scholarship to the Pratt School of Art & Design in Brooklyn, New York, recognizes brilliance in student art achievement and artistic involvement at the high school level.

ELIGIBILITY

This award is open to all NAHS high school seniors who are members of an active Chapter with a 3.0 GPA in all subjects. To keep the scholarship, students are required to major in Art Education and maintain a 3.0 GPA.

Deadline

Applications must be delivered digitally or postmarked no later than December 15.

SUBMIT

A completed Pratt application form; a letter of nomination listing student's name, chapter number, school, school address, and telephone number; high school transcript; a one-page typed listing of the student's artistic and extracurricular achievements in both school and community; five digital samples (if submitting via e-mail) representing a variety of the student's original art work or on disk (if submitting via hard copy), and a listing of titles and media used.

RISING STARS SECONDARY RECOGNITION PROGRAM

To promote art education as a career by recognizing 50 talented, active NAHS Members.

Recognition as a "Rising Star" will be given at the NAEA National Convention* along with a 4-year complimentary NAEA student membership (with proof of college enrollment and the pursuit of study in art education); and a 1-year, first-year professional membership (with proof of employment).

ELIGIBILITY

High School students in their junior or senior years interested in becoming art educators are eligible for this program. Nominees must be either in their junior or senior year at the time of both the nomination and the award presentation.

SUBMIT

A cover sheet containing nominee's name, home address, telephone number, e-mail address, school name, school address, school telephone, NAHS Sponsor's name, and chapter number; three letters of recommendation (one by an art educator, two from teachers and/or administrators); and official high school transcript; a student personal statement regarding art education goals; five digital samples of the nominee's artwork (on disk if submitting via hard copy); and a list denoting artwork titles and media used. All work must be original and not copied from other sources.

* Recipients of this award are not required to attend the Convention.

Read the full article at http://www.onlinedigeditions.com/article/Zoe+Kasprzyk+Receives+2014+Rising+Stars+Secondary+Recognition+Program+Award/1710865/209269/article.html.

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