Edible Michiana Winter 2014 : Page 22

liquid assets CALL HER MADAME Michiana cherries strut their stuff in Chicago beer BY MA Y A PAR S O N here are 50 pounds of Michiana cherries from Mick Klug Farm (Saint Joseph, Michigan) in every barrel of Goose Island Beer Company’s Madame Rose, a Belgian-style sour brown ale. The beer, produced in Chicago and coveted by craft beer lovers across the country, was released in May 2014 with national but lim-ited distribution. If you are lucky, you will be able to find a bottle at your favorite liquor or craft beer store. Fermented with wild yeasts and aged with Klug’s tart cherries in Cabernet wine casks for up to two years, Madame Rose is a dry, rich and malty sour with notes of brandied fruit, leather and wood. Ele-gant in taste and appearance (it pours a gorgeous crimson), Madame Rose references the Belgian masterpieces that inspired it—Flemish sour ales, like those from the legendary Rose Blancquaert-Merckx, Belgium’s first female brewmaster, the original Madame Rose. Goose Island brewer Brian Taylor, who perfected the Madame Rose recipe and carefully tends the ale throughout its fermentation and lengthy aging process, says that Madame Rose requires time and nurturing beyond any other beer produced at Goose—more than the other barrel-aged beers in the brewery’s Belgian-inspired Vintage series, which include Halia (a farmhouse ale aged with peaches), Ju-liet (a sour ale aged with blackberries) and Lolita (a wild-fermented pale ale aged with raspberries). But don’t call Madame Rose high maintenance; she’s more a labor of love. In fact, she’s Taylor’s favorite beer. 22 edible Michiana Winter 2014 T Asked how he likes to enjoy the ale, Taylor is quick to reply “with chocolate.” He remembers an especially delicious dessert pairing: a pastry chef ’s version of s’mores—chocolate ganache, sour cherry sauce and Madame Rose. But the richness and intensity of Madame Rose also holds up well to savory dishes, including red meats. Taylor recalls how one chef paired Madame Rose with foie gras and sour cherries. “It was,” he says, “probably my favorite pairing of all time.” Taste profile, color, and aroma: Madame Rose pours a deep crimson and smells of brandied cherries, leather and wet wood. ABV: 6.7%. IBU: 25. Availability: Limited release nationally in 765 ml bottles and on draft. Goose Island Beer Company Chicago, Illinois GooseIsland.com Mick Klug Farm Saint Joseph, Michigan MickKlugFarm.com P HOTOS COURTESY OF G OOSE I SLAND B EER C OMPANY

Liquid Assets

By Maya Parson

CALL HER MADAME

Michiana cherries strut their stuff in Chicago beer

There are 50 pounds of Michiana cherries from Mick Klug Farm (Saint Joseph, Michigan) in every barrel of Goose Island Beer Company's Madame Rose, a Belgian-style sour brown ale. The beer, produced in Chicago and coveted by craft beer lovers across the country, was released in May 2014 with national but limited distribution. If you are lucky, you will be able to find a bottle at your favorite liquor or craft beer store.

Fermented with wild yeasts and aged with Klug's tart cherries in Cabernet wine casks for up to two years, Madame Rose is a dry, rich and malty sour with notes of brandied fruit, leather and wood. Elegant in taste and appearance (it pours a gorgeous crimson), Madame Rose references the Belgian masterpieces that inspired it–Flemish sour ales, like those from the legendary Rose Blancquaert-Merckx, Belgium's first female brewmaster, the original Madame Rose.

Goose Island brewer Brian Taylor, who perfected the Madame Rose recipe and carefully tends the ale throughout its fermentation and lengthy aging process, says that Madame Rose requires time and nurturing beyond any other beer produced at Goose–more than the other barrel-aged beers in the brewery's Belgian-inspired Vintage series, which include Halia (a farmhouse ale aged with peaches), Juliet (a sour ale aged with blackberries) and Lolita (a wild-fermented pale ale aged with raspberries).

But don't call Madame Rose high maintenance; she's more a labor of love. In fact, she's Taylor's favorite beer.

Asked how he likes to enjoy the ale, Taylor is quick to reply "with chocolate." He remembers an especially delicious dessert pairing: a pastry chef 's version of s'mores–chocolate ganache, sour cherry sauce and Madame Rose.

But the richness and intensity of Madame Rose also holds up well to savory dishes, including red meats. Taylor recalls how one chef paired Madame Rose with foie gras and sour cherries. "It was," he says, "probably my favorite pairing of all time."

Taste profile, color, and aroma: Madame Rose pours a deep crimson and smells of brandied cherries, leather and wet wood. ABV: 6.7%. IBU: 25.

Availability: Limited release nationally in 765 ml bottles and on draft.

Goose Island Beer Company
Chicago, Illinois
GooseIsland.com

Mick Klug Farm
Saint Joseph, Michigan
MickKlugFarm.com

Q&A WITH GOOSE ISLAND BEER COMPANY'S BRIAN TAYLOR ON SOUR BEERS

Why are sour beers all the rage? As a brewer and a beer lover, what do you appreciate about sours?

You know how there are kids that love sour everything, like sour candy that's also sweet? It's an extreme taste, and the sour style can be off-putting at first to some people. But, once your taste buds get a hang of it, sour beers are super addictive and highly drinkable. (The alcohol level is typically 4%–7%.) Personally, I choose a sour just about every time I'm sitting in a bar. I'm a sour freak. The last five beers I created at Goose Island have all been sours.

Which sour beers do you most enjoy–other than your own Madame Rose?

At Goose Island, we just made a new sour, Lilith, which is a pomegranate Berliner weiss (a German-style sour). It tastes really, really good. And Juliet (a sour wild ale aged in wine barrels with blackberries), for me, is second only to Madame Rose.

My favorite Belgian sour beers come from Cantillon Brewery. I also like the Grand Cru from Rodenbach. Or any type of Gueze from Belgium–I'll drink that. American sours are not as hardcore as the Belgian sours. Here, we try to do everything super technical, whereas, in Belgium, they just open a window and let the yeast fall in. The Belgians have been making sour beers for 500 years. They are geniuses when it comes to sours.

Read the full article at http://onlinedigeditions.com/article/Liquid+Assets/1863802/234594/article.html.

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