EdibMont Spring 2013 : Page 21

LOCAL FOOD IN SEASON MARCH, APRIL, MAY Fruits: Apricots* • Avocados • Blackberries* • Cactus Pears* Grapefruit** • Kumquats** • Lemons • Limes** Mandarins** • Oranges • Pomelos** • Rhubarb** • Strawberries Vegetables: Artichokes • Arugula • Asparagus • Beets• Bok Choy • Broccoli • Broccoli Raab • Brussels Sprouts • Burdock Cabbage • Cardoons • Carrots • Cauliflower • Celeriac*** • Celery*** • Chard • Chicory • Collards • Cress • Dandelion Endive • Fava Beans and Greens • Fennel • Garlic • Horseradish • Kale • Kohlrabi • Leeks • Mushrooms • Mustard Greens Nettles • Onions • Orach • Parsnips • Peas** • Pea Shoots • Potatoes • Radishes • Rutabagas** • Shallots • Spinach Sprouts • Squash • Sunchokes • Turnips * May only ** March and April only ***April and May only Fish: Abalone (farmed) • California Halibut (hook-and-line) • Dungeness Crab • Lingcod • Market Squid • Pacific Sanddabs • Rock Cod/Snapper/Rockfish (hook-and-line, jig) • Sablefish/Black Cod (hook-and-line, jig) • Sole (Dover and Petrale) • Spot Prawns • White Seabass (hook-and-line) Stinging Nettle Beer Adapted from http://foragedfoods.co.uk Nettle beer tastes a little like ginger beer, and is a nice refresh-ing drink—especially when served cold. 1 gallon young nettles 2 pounds malt ¼ ounce root ginger 1 gallon water 12 ounces sugar 1 ounce dried hops 1 lemon 1 tablespoon yeast, activated Gather the nettles and put them in a saucepan (both leaves and stalks) along with the water, root ginger, malt and hops. Boil these ingredients together for about 15 minutes. Next, strain the liquid into a bucket. Add the sugar and then the juice of the lemon. Stir all of these until the sugar has dis-solved into the mixture. Wait until the liquid cools to about 70° F and then add the tablespoon of activated yeast. Cover the mixture and leave it in a warm place for about three days to ferment. Remove any of the froth that rises to the sur-face of the mixture. This is best done by skimming with a clean instrument. Gather some strong bottles, which will be used to contain the beer. Strain the mixture into the bottles and store in an upright position in a cool place—like a garden shed, garage or base-ment. Leave it to ferment for an extra week or so before drink-ing. Nettle beer tastes best after just over a week of fermenting and doesn’t need additional time to improve the flavor. Photo by Ted Holladay www.ediblemontereybay.com 21

Stinging Nettle Beer

Adapted from http://foragedfoods.co.uk

Nettle beer tastes a little like ginger beer, and is a nice refreshing drink – especially when served cold.

1 gallon young nettles
2 pounds malt
1/4 ounce root ginger
1 gallon water
12 ounces sugar
1 ounce dried hops
1 lemon
1 tablespoon yeast, activated

Gather the nettles and put them in a saucepan (both leaves and stalks) along with the water, root ginger, malt and hops. Boil these ingredients together for about 15 minutes.

Next, strain the liquid into a bucket. Add the sugar and then the juice of the lemon. Stir all of these until the sugar has dissolved into the mixture. Wait until the liquid cools to about 70° F and then add the tablespoon of activated yeast.

Cover the mixture and leave it in a warm place for about three days to ferment. Remove any of the froth that rises to the surface of the mixture. This is best done by skimming with a clean instrument.

Gather some strong bottles, which will be used to contain the beer. Strain the mixture into the bottles and store in an upright position in a cool place – like a garden shed, garage or basement. Leave it to ferment for an extra week or so before drinking. Nettle beer tastes best after just over a week of fermenting and doesn't need additional time to improve the flavor.

Read the full article at http://onlinedigeditions.com/article/Stinging+Nettle+Beer/1320236/147246/article.html.

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